Tourist Guide > What to see > Heritage of the Past > Jewish Monuments

The Jewish Quarter Třebíč

One of the oldest and most important centres of of Jewish settlement in Bohemia is located in the city of Třebíč. Besides Jerusalem, the Jewish monuments in Třebíč are the only that have been inscribed on their own to the UNESCO World Cultural and Natural Heritage List (in 2003). This uniquely preserved Jewish quarter—the largest complex of preserved Jewish monuments in the Czech Republic

Rear Synagogue Třebíč

The Rear Synagogue was built in 1669, or shortly thereafter. The Jewish town sought to expand the synagogue, which the ruling nobility not only rejected in 1693, but also ordered its demolition. Despite this fact, instead of complete demolition, "only" the roof was torn down, and the entire structure fell into disrepair. In 1705, the Jewish town applied to the new owners of the estate, Count Johan

Front Synagogue Třebíč

The Front Synagogue was most likely built in 1639–1642. It has been repaired and renovated numerous times, such as the reconstruction after an extensive fire in 1821. Roughly 200 years later, in 1856–1857, the area saw its largest construction activity, once again after a large fire. The synagogue was renovated in the Neo-Gothic style we see today. Since the 1950s, the Front Synagogue has

Synagogue Nová Cerekev

Built in 1855, the synagogue is one of the most interesting Jewish buildings in the Vysočina Region, and is the only surviving example of its type in Central Europe. It was built by Štěpán Walser. This Neo-Romanesque structure with Moorish elements is located in the northern part of the city, approximately 200 m from the main town square. At first glance, the synagogue captivates w

Regional Jewish Museum – Synagogue Polná

The old synagogue stood in the Dolní město (Lower Town) in 1675. After the development of the Jewish town at the so-called "Horní město" ("Upper Town"), the ruling nobility had a brand new stone and brick domed synagogue built. After its numerous fires, it was always rebuilt. The only surviving original Baroque elements of the synagogue are four characteristic elongated arched windows and a fr

Regional Jewish Museum: Rabbinical House Polná

In 1717, the addition of a another floor to the house neighbouring the synagogue created a Jewish community centre with a residence for the shammes (beadle) and a scullery with a matzo bakery and an entrance to the ritual bath in the cellar. The first floor housed the rabbi's residence, town offices, and rabbinical chapel (winter prayer hall) with 30 seats. Between 1785 and 1850, it also housed a

Monuments of Jewish Settlements in Vysočina

Jews began arriving in Vysočina in the early Middle Ages. They settled in locations of important markets, on the crossroads of long-distance trade routes, and near royal residences. They were subordinate directly to the ruler, and were forced to pay considerable sums for permission to settle in a specific location. For centuries, they were a people living on the fringes of the societal hierarchy.

Třebíč

Třebíč was once a significant Moravian Jewish cultural centre, as is evidenced by the uniquely preserved quarter. The first written mention of the presence of Jews in Třebíč appeared in 1338, and later also in the early 15th century. At the time, several families lived here in various locations across the city, but there is no specific information on the number of Jewish residents or the Jew

In the Footsteps of Abbots and Rabbis Educational Trail

(Třebíč) The UNESCO monuments in Třebíč are linked by an educational trail that introduces visitors to about the most interesting locations around the Jewish town, Jewish cemetery, as well as St Procopius Christian basilica. It reveals glimpses of the lives of the religious communities that have lived side by side for centuries here.

Telč

In the late 1600s, the Jewish community in Telč resided primarily on Židovská and Hradební ulice Streets in houses that adjoined the city ramparts, which was also the location of the synagogue. The synagogue, however, was damaged in a fire in 1885. It was adapted after the war, and now serves other functions. During the course of the 19th century, the Jewish population in Telč experienced a s

Gustav Mahler House Jihlava

Shortly after the birth of Gustav Mahler, his entire family moved from Kaliště to Jihlava, where the future composer spent his childhood and youth. The house where he grew up features an exposition titled "Gustav Mahler a Jihlava" ("Gustav Mahler and Jihlava"). The exposition is divided into several sections that capture Mahler's youth, musical opus, and later interactions with Jihlava. In

Jihlava

Jewish settlement in Jihlava can be dated to shortly after the foundation of the city itself, in the mid-13th century. The eclipse of Jewish quarter, including the synagogue and cemetery, took place following the expulsion of the Jews from the city in 1426. Jewish families dispersed from here to the surrounding towns and small cities. The more recent Jewish town functioned here beginning



Jewish Cemetery Humpolec

The local cemetery is situated outside of the city o Humpolec, not far from Orlík Castle. It was established in the early 18th century and served the surrounding Jewish towns as well (Kaliště, Lipnice, Želiv, etc.). It was later expanded twice. Roughly 1,000 valuable Baroque and Classicist heads

The Empire synagogue Třešť

After a fire in 1824 that destroyed the Třešť Jewish ghetto, an Empire-style synagogue was built thanks to the financial support of Isaac Wiesenwald and a public collection. The synagogue is located north of Náměstí T. G. Masaryka Square on Ulice Franze Kafky Street. It is the only one in the

Polná

Documented evidence of a Jewish community in Polná dates back to the 15th century. However, the community was not allowed to build in the city until the second half of the 17th century. The ghetto and synagogue were established in 1681–1685, and its state of preservation, comprehensiveness, and i

Jewish Cemetery Kamenice nad Lipou

The Jewish cemetery in Kamenice nad Lipou is situated on the edge of town. This locale offers a beautiful view of the surrounding landscape. The cemetery was founded in 1803, and there are approximately 150 surviving gravestones that originated in the first half of the 19th century. Some are in the

Synagogue Humpolec

The first Jews came to Humpolec in 1681, and their community gradually grew. In 1724, however, there was still no independent synagogue or school, so residents used the local potash production facilities for these purposes. In 1754, the Jewish town requested a construction permit for a maso

New Synagogue Velké Meziříčí

Construction on the Neo-Gothic New Synagogue was completed in 1870 on the designs of Viennese architect Augustin Prokop. Its distinctive appearance originates from the use of red brickwork, and the front facade features two Hebrew inscriptions. It is currently serves other functions. A thi

Old Synagogue Velké Meziříčí

The Old Synagogue, with its original, priceless Classicist portal that dates back to the 1500s, was historically restored, and was used for organising expositions. The women's gallery hosted the "Magen David" museum exposition, which illustrated the history of the local Jewish population.

Jewish Cemetery Velké Meziříčí

In 1650, the Jewish community bought a plot of land for 60 florins in order to establish a cemetery. The cemetery includes a Neo-Romanesque ceremonial hall and over 1,300 graves with headstones. The oldest legible headstone is from 1677. The cemetery was used until the Second World War.

Jewish Cemetery Humpolec

The local cemetery is situated outside of the city o Humpolec, not far from Orlík Castle. It was established in the early 18th century and served the surrounding Jewish towns as well (Kaliště, Lipnice, Želiv, etc.). It was later expanded twice. Roughly 1,000 valuable Baroque and Classicist h

The Jewish Typhoid Cemetery Havlíčkův Brod

Approximately 1.5 km north of Havlíčkův Brod (past the cemetery) lies a truly unique Jewish monument. In the centre of a field stands an island of tall trees that have been planted in perpendicular rows creating alleyways in the shape of a cross. The remaining area is filled with shorter, more de

Moravské Budějovice

The first mention of Jews in Moravské Budějovice dates back to the 14th century. The medieval Jewish quarter with its synagogue and cemetery faded out after the expulsion of the Jews from the city in 1564. Modern settlements here were recorded beginning in the 19th century. After the war, the Art

Police

The first families came to Police most likely during the course of the 16th century. The oldest written record from 1671 states that Jewish settlers came to Police from Vienna. However, even here, the growing Jewish population was subject to the resentment of the local residents, so in 1728, the Jew

Jewish Cemetery Telč

The Jewish cemetery was built in the second half of the 19th century. Until then, Jews in the Telč region were buried in the cemetery in the nearby town of Velký Pečín. The Telč Jewish cemetery is situated on the southeastern edge of town, a short distance from Staroměstský Pond. The cemetery

Synagogue Telč

The Telč synagogue was built in the Neo-Romanesque style in 1904. It served the Jewish town until the Second World War, when its interior furnishings were completely destroyed by the Nazis. After the war had ended, the building became the property of the city, which modified it for its own use, and

Třešť

The first traces of a Jewish population in Třešť, where they settled after their expulsion from Jihlava, dates back to the 1400s. After a decree issued by Count Ferdinand Ernst Herberstein in the second half of the 17th century, all of the residents of the Jewish town were forced to relocate to

The Jewish cemetery Třešť

The Jewish cemetery in Třešť, which lies on the southern edge of the city, was established some time around the mid-17th century. The cemetery has over a thousand Baroque- and Classicist-style gravestones, the oldest of which dates 1705, and belongs to Rachel, daughter of Geršon. During the Seco

Gustav Mahler Park Jihlava

Gustav Mahler Park is a remembrance of the world-renowned musical composer Gustav Mahler, as well as a reminder of the history of the area. It was once the location of a synagogue, which was burned to the ground by the Nazis. It is memorialised by its exposed foundations. A dominant featur

Golčův Jeníkov

The roots of Jewish settlement in this town allegedly reach back to the 12th century. First written evidence, however, comes from the Berní rula (a tax cadastre) from the year 1654. Over the course of the centuries, the Jewish community expanded, and in the first half of the 18th century, it was ho

Jewish Cemetery Světlá nad Sázavou

Up until 1886, burials took place at the so-called "old cemetery" established in 1742. The gravestones from this cemetery were removed during the Nazi occupation. The local Jewish cemetery was established in 1887. The Nový Hřbitov (New Cemetery) was founded in 1887, with approximately 170 survivin

Ledeč nad Sázavou

The historical presence of a Jewish community in Ledeč nad Sázavou is evidenced by surviving monuments, such as its Jewish cemetery and synagogue. 1942 was a fateful year for the Ledeč Jewish population as well, when the Jewish town was abandoned due to the deportation of Jewish citizens to conce



Jewish Synagogue Habry

The Jewish Synagogue, dating from 1825, was rebuilt in 1979 into a wide screen cinema.

The Jewish Synagogue Golčův Jeníkov

In 1659 there was only a wooden chapel on the site of the Jewish synagogue. It was destroyed by fire. Between 1871 and 1873 a new synagogue was built in the neo-Romanesque style, adorned with Moorish decorative elements. Above the main outer gable the Ten Commandments of Moses are written in gilded

The Jewish Cemetery Jihlava

The Jewish cemetery in Jihlava is a significant monument that reminds us of the existence of the Jewish town in the city. It was established in 1869, and includes 1,120 contemporary gravestones. In the early 1900s, a ceremonial hall was built at its entrance on the designs of Viennese architect Wilh

The Seligmann Bauer House

(Třebíč) Seligmann Bauer had the house built shortly before 1798 on the so-called "Španělský pozemek" ("Spanish Land"). The value of this house stems from its direct connection to the Rear Synagogue. Inside the house there is a staircase accessing the women's gallery in the synagogue, and the house's owne

Jewish Cemetery Třebíč

The location of the original cemetery of the medieval Jewish population of the city is not known. The Jewish cemetery at Hrádek was mentioned in written sources for the first time indirectly in 1636 in connection with aristocratic regulations on the burial of extralocal Jews. With an area of 11,7

Jewish Cemetery Brtnice

Jewish people's prominent position in Brtnice's history is evidenced by the fact that the area boasted at least two Jewish cemeteries. The so-called "starý hřbitov" ("old cemetery") was situated along the road to Panská Lhota, and was established prior to 1600 as a replacement of an even older c

Zichpil Quarter Humpolec

The Zichpil Quarter and the Jewish town are a part of the the city of Humpolec, and are located between the Horní náměstí Square and the cemetery. The first Jews at the time still on the outskirts of the city began to settle here in the late 1600s. The name Zichpil, however, is much older. T

Jewish Cemetery Polná

The burial site for Polná Jews is located at the Donlí město (Downtown) – Pod Kalvárií, where the former residential complex of several Jewish families stood until the the second half of the 17th century. The cemetery was most likely established in the early 16th century. The oldest section o

The Jewish Synagogue Ledeč nad Sázavou

The Jewish synagogue lies not far from Husovo náměstí Square, on Na Potoce Street. The former 1606 synagogue was built out of wood, and after a fire in the 18th century, it was replaced by a new, single-storey building in the Folk Baroque style. Unfortunately, this new synagogue succumbed t

The Jewish Cemetery Police

On the southern edge of the town of Police lies a preserved Jewish cemetery that was founded 17th century at the latest. The cemetery houses approximately 300 headstones, which include several priceless Baroque and Classicist steles. A number of these feature very interesting symbolism.The graveston

Jihlava

Jewish settlement in Jihlava can be dated to shortly after the foundation of the city itself, in the mid-13th century. The eclipse of Jewish quarter, including the synagogue and cemetery, took place following the expulsion of the Jews from the city in 1426. Jewish families dispersed from here to the

The Jewish Cemetery Golčův Jeníkov

The Jewish cemetery lies about 0.5 km west of the town. Its eastern part hides the oldest tombstones; however, the signs on them are illegible today. The tombstones with legible signs date from the 16th century, the baroque tombstones from the mid-eighteenth century and the pseudo-baroque ones from

Jewish Cemetery Pacov

The oldest surviving legible headstones in the Pacov Jewish cemetery are dated 1796. The Jewish cemetery, however, was established in 1680, with the last burial taking place here in 1969. The cemetery has a total of approximately 300 Baroque- and Classicist-style headstones. Synagogue

Jewish Cemetery Nová Cerekev

The old Jewish cemetery that lies 100 m northwest of the synagogue was founded around 1690. There are 137 surviving headstones with inscriptions in Hebrew and Aramaic. The oldest headstone is from 1692. After the cemetery reached its capacity, it was supplemented by a new cemetery with 270 headstone

Jewish Cemetery Jemnice

The Jemnice Jewish cemetery was established in the mid-14th century, and is decidedly one of the oldest Jewish burial sites in Moravia. There are approximately 400 gravestones, the oldest of which comes from the 1600s. In 1824, a mortuary was built at the cemetery, but this was demolished in 1955–

Brtnice

It is believed that Jewish settlers came to Brtnice as early as the 14th century. This fact, however, remains unsubstantiated. Documented proof of the presence of Jewish settlers dates from the mid-17th century. During the period between the late 1700s through the mid-1800s, approximately 60 Jewish

Jewish Cemetery Batelov

The historical presence of Jews in Batelov is remembered only by their gravestones in the cemetery hidden in a deciduous forest not far from town. The cemetery emerged in the second half of the 15th century. It has both Baroque and Classicist gravestones. The oldest legible gravestone is dated 1715.

Synagogue Batelov

The former synagogue was destroyed in a fire in 1790. Four years later, a new synagogue emerged in its place, which was renovated in the Classicist style in 1825. The synagogue served its religious worship function up until the Second World War, however, after the war had ended, the Jewish town was

Jewish Cemetery Horní Cerekev

This cemetery with Baroque gravestones from the 18th century was founded as early as the 17th century. The youngest gravestones are from the period leading up to World War II. The cemetery also includes a mortuary with a tented roof. The sacred atmosphere is enhanced by the centuries-old trees that

Jewish Cemetery Černovice

The Jewish cemetery in Černovice was founded as early as 1600, and was later expanded in 1680 and 1785. The cemetery features a number of Baroque and Classicist gravestones. The cemetery was repaired, and, in the autumn of 2001, a memorial to the victims of the Holocaust (whose atypical design

Jewish Cemetery Chotěboř

Just like so many others, the Chotěboř Jewish town did not to survive the period of Nazi occupation and was decimated. In terms of age, the Chotěboř Jewish cemetery is one of the youngest in the country, and one of its unusual features is that it is encircled by a Catholic cemetery

The Jewish Cemetery Habry

The Jewish cemetery here was most likely founded in the 14th century. The earliest documented evidence of the cemetery, however, comes from the 17th century The cemetery features valuable Baroque and Classicist gravestones, with the oldest marked with the year 1740.

The Jewish Cemetery Ledeč nad Sázavou

One of the oldest Jewish cemeteries in the Czech lands was founded in the early 17th century, with some sources listing a date of 1601. It is situated on the southwestern edge of town as a part of the municipal cemetery complex. It is the final resting place of approximately 1,000 Jews from Lede

The Jewish Cemetery Světlá nad Sázavou

Up until 1886, burials took place at the so-called "old cemetery" established in 1742. The gravestones from this cemetery were removed during the Nazi occupation. The local Jewish cemetery was established in 1887. The Nový Hřbitov (New Cemetery) was founded in 1887, with approximately 170 survivin

Jemnice

The city of Jemnice is home to one of the oldest Jewish towns in the Czech Republic. First written mention dates as early as 1336. There are a total of 23 surviving buildings of the former Jewish quarter neighbouring the town square on its southern end (today the Zámecka and U Templu Street area).

The Jewish Cemetery Moravské Budějovice

At first, Moravské Budějovice Jews buried their deceased in cemeteries in the surrounding towns —Jemnice, Police, and Třebič. They later established their own cemetery, but this was abandoned during the 18th century. In 1908, the city granted land to the community for the foundation of a new c

The Synagogue Police

The first documented synagogue in Police used to stand on the village green. It was transformed into a residential house after 1728. Another synagogue was built in Židovská ulice (Jewish Street), which unfortunately burned down during a fire in 1758. The very next year, (1759), a new brick synagog

Puklice

After the expulsion of the Jews from Jihlava that took place in the 1400s, the Jewish exiles found refuge in the surrounding towns and small cities. Puklice was one of these towns. At the time, the Jewish quarter was comprised of a total of 14 houses and 4 meat shops. A small synagogue, or perhaps m

Jewish Cemetery Střítež

Approximately 500 m to the southwest of town, by the Zámecký Pond lies a Jewish cemetery where visitors can find headstones with Hebrew, German, and Czech inscriptions. It dates between the 18th and 20th centuries. The older stone steles feature ornamental decorations.

Jewish Cemetery Lukavec

The cemetery was established in the first third of the 18th century at the latest, but most likely existed much earlier than this. It has approximately 100 headstones and a simple mortuary. The oldest dated headstone is from 1725.

Jewish Cemetery Hořepník

Founded in the first half of the 1600s, the Jewish cemetery is located on the southwestern edge of the town of Hořepník by the Trnava River. There are over 200 surviving headstones, of which the oldest dates 1649. This cemetery too was expanded, and functioned until 1940, the year of the last buri

Jewish Cemetery Košetice

Jews were typically granted land for burial sites in hard-to-reach locales, and the situation in Košetice was no different. The Jewish cemetery here is located in a forest in the tree undergrowth southeast of town. It exists in its current dimensions on stable cadastre maps from as early as 1838. T

Jewish cemetery Chotěboř;

Just like so many others, the Chotěboř Jewish town did not to survive the period of Nazi occupation and was decimated. In terms of age, the Chotěboř Jewish cemetery is one of the youngest in the country, and one of its unusual features is that it is encircled by a Catholic cemetery

Jewish cemetery Habry

The Jewish cemetery here was most likely founded in the 14th century. The earliest documented evidence of the cemetery, however, comes from the 17th century The cemetery features valuable Baroque and Classicist gravestones, with the oldest marked with the year 1740

Černovice

Čenovice's Jewish quarter has stood north of the town square since the 18th century, and is represented by a handful of buildings and a defunct distillery, inn, and synagogue, which was built in 1807. In 1857, it was reconstructed, though it was ultimately torn down in 1949. The Jewish population h

Nová Cerekev

The Jewish town with is prayer hall originated here most likely around 1690. It is interesting that there was never an enclosed ghetto, but most of the houses were concentrated in the area surrounding the synagogue, and some stood on the town square. A number of the original Jewish houses have survi

Jewish Cemetery Pavlov

One of the smallest Jewish cemeteries in the Czech Republic is located in the tree undergrowth approximately 800 m outside of the town of Pavlov. It is believed to have been founded at the turn of the 19th century. Today, it has 27 surviving simple steles, which are scattered throughout the entire c

Jewish Synagogue Kamenice nad Lipou

The former synagogue was torn down in 1938. That year, a new synagogue was opened at the location of today's bus station. The new synagogue is considered to be the youngest Jewish synagogue in the Czech Republic. Currently, it is utilised as an evangelical prayer hall.

Mahler Jihlava Festival: Music of Thousands

The Music of Thousands music festival's series of concerts, vocal recitals, and other social events serves as a remembrance of the renowned Vysočina native: composer and conductor Gustav Mahler. This annual classical music festival began in 2002. It links all of the places related to Gustav Ma

Velké Meziříčí

It is believed that the first Jews came to Velké Meziříčí as early as the 15th century, with further significant settlement development occuring after the Thirty Years' War. A number of renowned rabbis were involved with the local yeshivah here, and in the 18th century, Jews made up one third o

Humpolec

Mention of a Jewish community in Humpolec can be found as early as the second half of the 17th century, however, the settlement did not become true Jewish town until the beginning of the 18th century. This compact Jewish ghetto was originally made up of approximately 30 houses with a small town squa

Jewish Cemetery Větrný Jeníkov

The local Jewish cemetery was established most likely in the first half of the 17th century, served as a burial site for Jews from the neighbouring towns of Úsobí and Herálec as well. Today, its area of 960 square metres includes almost 250 surviving gravestones, the oldest of which dates back to

Batelov

Židovská čtvrť v Batelově byla zmiňována od poloviny 15. století. Přišly sem také židovské rodiny, které byly vypovězeny z Jihlavy. V těch dobách byla pravděpodobně ustavena židovská obec, která ovšem od doby druhé světové války neexistuje. Situována byla na severovýchod

The Brady Family and Hana's Suitcase

(Nové Město na Moravě) Directly on Vratislavovo náměstí Square in Nové Město na Moravě stands house no. 13, which is closely tied to the Bradys, a Jewish family whose story circumnavigated the world as a reference for future generations. The tragic fate of eleven-year-old Hana Brady, who, during the years of the Naz

 
 
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